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Welcome to ArthriPhase.com

ArthriPhase® is an advanced, front-line herbal formula designed to promote healthy joint and circulatory performance. The proprietary blend of herbs comprising ArthriPhase has been shown to work on numerous chemical pathways to support joint health and soothe discomfort by helping to normalize inflammatory responses. In addition to helping keep joints flexible and comfortable, ArthriPhase also supports healthy cartilage and joint strength.*

OsteoarthritisKnee1Joint problems generally involve the loss of articular cartilage – the smooth, slippery tissue covering the ends of bones that allows them to slide smoothly across each other as joints bend and flex. Joint issues begin as a normal inflammatory response that, for reasons not fully understood, results in changes to articular cartilage that causes the tissues to soften and swell up, making cartilage more susceptible to normal stresses.

Continued use of the joint further inflames the surrounding synovial membranes and irritates the cartilage, leaving the once-smooth surface covered with pits and crevasses that further compromise the affected joint. Eventually, articular cartilage can be completely stripped from the bones, necessitating surgical intervention.

 

“I am an 84-year-old woman with joint issues in my fingers. The pain would wake me up every night between 3 and 4 am so I could never get a good night’s sleep. ArthriPhase worked beautifully the first time I used it.

Now I take 2 capsules of ArthriPhase just before going to bed and I sleep through the night. That’s amazing to me, as I tried everything else, and nothing worked.

I gave two of my pills to my sister who also has joint issues. They worked overnight and the next day she asked for two more. I told her she should order some herself as I did not want to run out before I bought more.”

Marcella M.
Wisconsin

 

Concern over side effects associated with conventional sore joint therapies has sparked a renewed scientific interest in traditional natural remedies. A review of leading Chinese and English language medical journals reveals a number of recently published studies detailing new insights into the biological and biochemical mechanisms of Chinese herbs historically used to safely help relieve joint discomfort and swelling.

  • Gastrodia (Tian Ma, Rhizoma Gastrodiae Elata)
    In studies, Gastrodia has demonstrated novel pain relief and inflammatory-mediating activities, as well as in vivo and in vitro inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production. (1)
  • Rehmannia (Shi Di Huang, Radix Rehmanniae Glutinosae Preparata)
    An iridoid glycoside found in Rehmannia, catalpol, exerts its protective effect on dopaminergic neurons by helping inhibit microglial activation, thereby regulating production of pro-inflammatory factors. (2)
  • Tang-kuei (Bai Zhi, Radix Angelicae Dahurica)
    Tang-kuei has been shown to modulate inflammation by decreasing leukocyte counts, neutrophil density, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression. Tang-kuei has also been found to increase levels of PGD2, an important natural prostaglandin involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Most significantly, Tang-kuei is a natural source of ferulic acid, a potent antioxidant that protects cells from damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). (3)
  • Notoperygium (Qiang Huo, Radix et Rhizoma Notopterygii)
    Notoperygium is used in traditional medicine to temporarily relieve discomfort due to aching in the limbs and joints, especially in the upper part of the body. Notoperygium has been demonstrated in studies to inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and COX enzymes. (4)
  • Eucommia (Du Zhong, Cortex Eucommiae Ulmoidis)
    Eucommia is derived from the Eucommia, or hardy rubber tree. In traditional Chinese medicine, Eucommia is used to strengthen the bones and muscles and alleviate discomfort in the lower back and legs. Eucommia contains a substance, iridoid glycoside, that has a long history of use for inflammation.(5) One glycoside, aucubin, has been shown to be a specific inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation in mast cells, which might explain its beneficial effects. (6)
  • Chinese Ligusticum (Gao Ben, Radix et Rhizoma Ligustici Sinensis)
    Alkaloids found in Chinese Ligusticum have been shown in studies to inhibit TNF-alpha production and TNF-alpha-mediated NF-kappaB activation.(7) One study conducted in Japan showed that active compounds found in Ligustici Sinensis have inflammatory modulating and pain reducing effects on early and late stages joint issues. (8)
  • Cyathula (Niu Xi, Radix Cyathulae)
    Cyathula has been shown to inhibit collagen-induced joint discomfort and swelling. (9) Most significantly, two novel triterpene glycosides isolated from Cyathula have been shown to be 1,000 times more potent than Sialyl Lewis X (SleX), an important blood group antigen that inhibits excess recruitment of neutrophils to tissues. (10)
  • Scrophularia (Xuan Shen, Radix Scrophularia Ningpoensis)
    Extracts of Scrophularia have been shown to mediate swelling, cell infiltration and proliferation of activated T-lymphocytes in joint tissues. (11) Additionally, Scrophularia has been shown to inhibit a number of inflammatory factors, including prosta-glandin E2, leukotriene B4, NO, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-2, interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma, but with no negative effect on the production of interleukin-10, a powerful cytokine involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses. (12) Moreover, Scrophularia is the source of a unique glycoterpenoid, Verbascosaponin A. (13)
  • Aconite (Fu Zi, Radix Lateralis Aconiti Charmichaeli Praeparata)
    Aconite has been shown to exhibit especially potent temporary pain relieving properties, according to a study conducted by researchers with the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Their research reveals that one of the active ingredients in Aconite, bulleyaconitine A, or BLA, strongly reduces sodium channel currents to block overactive pain signals for prolonged periods of time. (14)

References

1. Ahn EK, Jeon HJ, Lim EJ, Jung HJ, Park EH. Anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities of Gastrodia elata Blume. J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Apr 4;110(3):476-82. Epub 2006 Oct 19.
2. Tian YY, An LJ, Jiang L, Duan YL, Chen J, Jiang B. Catalpol protects dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced neurotoxicity in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, Life Sci., 2006 Dec 23. Pubmed ID: 17049947.
3. Jung SM, Schumacher HR, Kim H, Kim M, Lee SH, Pessler F. Reduction of urate crystal-induced inflammation by root extracts from traditional oriental medicinal plants: elevation of prostaglandin D2 levels, Arthritis Res Ther. 2007 Jul 5;9(4):R64.
4. Zschocke S, Lehner M, Bauer R. 5-Lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitory active constituents from Qianghuo (Notopterygium incisum). Planta Med. 1997 Jun;63(3):203-6.
5. Park KS, Chang IM. Anti-inflammatory activity of aucubin, Planta Med. 2004 Aug. Pubmed ID: 15326552.
6. : Jeong HJ, Koo HN, Na HJ, Kim MS, Hong SH, Eom JW, Kim KS, Shin TY, Kim HM, Inhibition of TNF-alpha and IL-6 production by Aucubin through blockade of NF-kappaB activation RBL-2H3 mast cells, Cytokine. 2002 Jun 7. Pubmed ID: 12161100.
7. Liu L, Ning ZQ, Shan S, Zhang K, Deng T, Lu XP, Cheng YY. Phthalide Lactones from Ligusticum chuanxiong inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production and TNF-alpha-mediated NF-kappaB Activation. Planta Med. 2005 Sep;71(9):808-13.
8. Ozaki Y. Anti-inflammatory effect of tetramethylpyrazine and ferulic acid, J. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1992. Pubmed ID: 1525949
9. Han SB, Lee CW, Yoon YD, et al. inflammation using an oriental herbal combination BDX-1 isolated from Achyranthes bidentata and Atractylodes japonica., Arch Pharm Res. 2005 Aug;28(8):902-8.
10. Ida Y, Satoh Y, Katsumata M, et al. Two novel oleanolic acid saponins having a sialyl Lewis X mimetic structure from Achyranthes fauriei root. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 1998 Sep 22;8(18):2555-8.
11. Schinella GR, Tournier HA, Prieto JM, Mordujovich de Buschiazzo P, Ros JL. Antioxidant activity of anti-inflammatory plant extracts. Life Sci. 2002 Jan 18;70(9):1023-33.
12. Li YM, Han ZH, Jiang SH, Jiang Y, Yao SD, Zhu DY. Fast repairing of oxidized OH radical adducts of dAMP and dGMP by phenylpropanoid glycosides from Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2000 Dec;21(12):1125-8.
13. Giner RM, Villalba ML, Recio MC, Mñez S, Cerd-Nicols M, Ros J. Anti-inflammatory glycoterpenoids from Scrophularia auriculata, Eur J Pharmacol. 2000 Feb 18;389(2-3):243-52.
14. Wang CF, Gerner P, Wang SY, Wang GK. Bulleyaconitine A isolated from aconitum plant displays long-acting local anesthetic properties in vitro and in vivo, Anesthesiology. 2007 Jul;107(1):82-90.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.